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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright. since a few people are looking for some info on my sump/refugium I'll be making a "How To Guide".

This is the main Goal.


This is where I put my skimmer. (I switched to a CPR2 BakPak)


This is the main goal at work.


Alright, I can't give exact measurements for the glass to be cut since not all 10 Gal aquariums are the same size. (I found this out the hard way by going with my previous measurements... then needing to get more glass.



All of the Baffles in BLUE go to the bottom completely.

All of the Baffles in RED go all the way to the bottom of the plastic.

Baffle A. Should be about 3.5" to 4" Tall.
Baffle C. Determines the water level in the refugium area. You may want to lower this area if you have a large volume aquarium.
Baffle D. Can be about 1" from the black plastic edge OR you can make it lower to give the chaeto more of a tumble.
Baffles B and E should be about 1" from the bottom of the glass.

ok, so that will give you a rough idea as to the height of your glass.

Next up is the width. This one, you'll have to measure out on your own. But, I would suggest having an extra 1/8" on each side, so make your width measurement 1/4 too short, this way you can move it easily into place.

Here are the points you can measure from on the outside of your tank.



If you don't want to cut the glass yourself you can go to just about any local hardware store give them the dimensions and they will cut the glass there for little to no extra cost.

Using 100% Silicone, with no mold inhibitors and other chemicals you'll be putting the baffles into their places.

I would suggest doing Baffle A and E first.
The silicone Baffle B and D next.
The last baffle to go in will be C.

However before putting any baffles in place.
1. Get a dry erase marker.
2. Get a tape measure.
3. Get either 4 bricks... or books.
4. Know the dimensions of your skimmer, return pump, where your return and water entry lines will be going.
5. 4x 2" pieces of cardboard bent at 90"
6. A LOT of papertowel for clean-up.
7. 4x plastic soda caps with holes drilled in them and a string attached through the holes.

Alright, now that you have what you will be needing here's how to silicone baffles into place.

I'm going to be using some fake measurements for a return pump and skimmer.
Return Pump 3"
Skimmer Pump 2.5"

Start by using the measurements of the return pump. If the pumps is 3" wide you'll want to have the first section 4" wide.

So, make the a mark 4" from the side of the tank for Baffle A. Then use your square to make a line going straight up. Do the same on the opposite side of the tank.

Baffle A:
After you have your line on the tank you can place Baffle A in the tank where it need to be by following the lines on each side, then place a brick on each side of it. After the bricks are in place silicone each side of Baffle A. Make sure that the silicone goes under the glass and comes out on the other side. You may only be able to silicone one side of the glass.

Baffle E:
Once you have measured the skimmer pump you can make the makes the same way you did on Baffle A. Afterword place the baffle into place with two pieces of cardboard supporting it 1" from the bottom. then place both bricks on each side of the baffle and silicone into place.

Once baffle A is somewhat in place let it sit for about an hour till the silicone can hold the glass on it's own. After remove the bricks and silicone the bottom in place. Remember to silicone completely under the glass.

Let the silicone sit for about 8 hours.

Then move onto baffles B and D.

My baffles are only about 1/2" apart from each other. It's to save room and increase the spead of water between them, plus it keeps and hermits or anything else I keep in my refugium from getting stuck in the return pump.

Remove the bricks from inside the aquarium.

Baffle B.
Measure a soda cap (that has a hole drilled in it. With string attached.) Then use the dry erase marker to make another line where Baffle B will go. Again using the square to make sure your line is at 90 degrees.

Place a piece of the cardboard at the bottom keeping the glass 1" from the bottom. Then place two of the four bottle caps between Baffle A and B, and place a brick on the other side holding Baffle B in place, then silicone the sides of Baffle B in place.

Moving on....

I think the others should be easy enough once you have gotten this far... if not I can go on. but I think it would be repitous

Added Info By TimMSU

What I do is take the difference of my water line and the inlet of my overflow, durso drain or sump box wier to figure out how much the tank will drain. To do this just look at how your overflow, durso or sump box wier depth in comparison to your water level and then do a little math. Lets say you have a 24" cube and your durso is 2" under the water level:

24" x 24" x 2" = 1152 cubic inches

1152 Cu. in. x (1 gallon/231 Cu. in.) = 4.99 Gallons

- or -

1152 Cu. in / 231 Cu. in = 4.99 gallons

(1 us gallon = 231 Cu. in.)

This means your sump needs enough area to hold an extra 5 gallons (and I would add 20% to that for a safe margin of error). So 6 gallons.

To figure out how much area you need, you can use the area over the macro and return pump section for this holding area. You would just take the footprint measurement of the two chambers and then divide that into the Cu. in. of how much water you need to hold, or in mathematical equations:

Lets say the two chambers measure 12" wide by 14" long,

12" x 14" = 168 square inches

6 gallons x 231 Cu. in = 1386 Cu. in

Now just take the volume of water you need and divide it by the two chambers foot print to get the depth of the area needed to hold 6 gallons of water.

1386 Cu. in / 168 sq. in. = 8.25"

To allow for enough area, you would take the height of your sump and then subtract 8.25" from (**EDIT**) baffle C and this will give you the proper area to keep your floor dry in the event of a power outage.

Now with a 10 gallon sump you may only have a 25-30 gallon tank so obviously my numbers are a bit out of context, but hopefully this doesn't completely make you all go cross-eyed.
Added Info by Chowderhead
For safety sake, the sharp fresh cut edges of the glass can be smoothed down by carefully using sandpaper to "round them down" a bit. WEAR GLOVES AND GLASSES!
More stuff from me.
I'm going to a Local Hardware store to buy and have them cut the glass for us.

Otherwise, I would sit a fishtank on the glass on the line I would want to cut. Then, take the glass cutter and move it along the edge of the tank that is sitting on the glass. That's how I usually make my cuts.

To break the glass, I turn it over then place the tank back on the newly cut line (while on a hard flat surface) then I lift on one side of the glass, and USUALLY it snaps across the line perfectly.

BTW, make sure to always wear gloves and eye protection.
Also, you can use a dremel to to sand the edges of the glass.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The Racks.

Ok, the racks are easy enough. cut to fit and keep them about 1.5" from the bottom.
 

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Good write up Johnos. The only thing I would add is you return pump area doesnt leave much room if the power goes out and your main tank drains into the sump. You need to figure out how much water will drain from your tank, then mathematically back your way into leaving enough extra space in the sump for such an occurrence.

What I do is take the difference of my water line and the inlet of my overflow, durso drain or sump box wier to figure out how much the tank will drain. To do this just look at how your overflow, durso or sump box wier depth in comparison to your water level and then do a little math. Lets say you have a 24" cube and your durso is 2" under the water level:

24" x 24" x 2" = 1152 cubic inches

1152 cu. in. x (1 gallon/231 cu. in.) = 4.99 Gallons

- or -

1152 cu. in / 231 cu. in = 4.99 gallons


(1 us gallon = 231 cu. in.)


This means your sump needs enough area to hold an extra 5 gallons (and I would add 20% to that for a safe margin of error). So 6 gallons.

To figure out how much area you need, you can use the area over the macro and return pump section for this holding area. You would just take the footprint measurement of the two chambers and then divide that into the cu. in. of how much water you need to hold, or in mathematical equations:

Lets say the two chambers measure 12" wide by 14" long,

12" x 14" = 168 square inches

6 gallons x 231 cu. in = 1386 cu. in

Now just take the volume of water you need and divide it by the two chambers foot print to get the depth of the area needed to hold 6 gallons of water.

1386 cu. in / 168 sq. in. = 8.25"

To allow for enough area, you would take the height of your sump and then subtract 8.25" from (**EDIT**) baffle C and this will give you the proper area to keep your floor dry in the event of a power outage.

Now with a 10 gallon sump you may only have a 25-30 gallon tank so obviously my numbers are a bit out of context, but hopefully this doesn't completely make you all go cross-eyed. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
With my Odyssea 500 WP, these measurements are dead on. Tim is correct that if you're using another more powerful pump, you will need a larger tank.

BTW, my tank is 32 Gallons. This allows only about 1 Gallon to return to the sump area.

Adjust Baffle C accordingly, this Baffle will determine the water height in the Chaeto area.

Thanks Tim for pointing that out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would like to build another one with a fellow reefer, this way we can make step by step photo instructions. Anyone out their need a 10 Gal sump or larger?
 

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Johnos said:
I would like to build another one with a fellow reefer, this way we can make step by step photo instructions. Anyone out their need a 10 Gal sump or larger?
I do but you are sooo far away! :(

-Scott

I have the tank and silicone!
 

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I've already got the ten gallon tank, I just need help turning it into a sump/fuge. Looks like your about two hours away from me though :(

Thanks for the info though, this will definitely help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cichlid333 and I may be working on a 55 Gal version of this tomorrow. I WILL be taking a lot of pics.
 
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john how are you cutting your glass for that as I have the 40 long sitting on my porch I need to cut glass for to build a sump out of it but the one piece of glass I have is thicker and not shure how easie it will cut maby you can give us some pointers on how to do this

I understand your glass you have for your ten is probly just 1/8 thick wich is easy to scribe and break
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm going to a Local Hardware store to buy and have them cut the glass for us. :p

Otherwise, I would sit a fishtank on the glass on the line I would want to cut. Then, take the glass cutter and move it along the edge of the tank that is sitting on the glass. That's how I usually make my cuts.

To break the glass, I turn it over then place the tank back on the newly cut line (while on a hard flat surface) then I lift on one side of the glass, and USUALLY it snaps across the line perfectly.

BTW, make sure to always wear gloves and eye protection.
 

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Great Design!!!!!!!!

For safety sake, the sharp fresh cut edges of the glass can be smoothed down by carefully using sandpaper to "round them down" a bit. WEAR GLOVES AND GLASSES!

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks everyone for the extra input...

I've added the new info to the first post.

BTW, I took some of the design ideas from Dentdominator. :p so, my design isn't entirely my own.
BTWW. Can a mod change the title of this thread to "How to build a Sump/Refugium" since there are no specific measurements.
 
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was wondering if you are not using any sand would it make more sense to have the first set of baffles (D and E) switched so that baffle D would be raised from the bottom. Would think that it would allow more flow through the rock area and then the water would move upward through the chaeto.

here is an attempt to show what im tryin to say
 

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thats a great lookin fuge it looks to me that the dividing walls are kinda high...keep an eye on that so it the power goes out it doesnt overflow
 
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toobrie said:
was wondering if you are not using any sand would it make more sense to have the first set of baffles (D and E) switched so that baffle D would be raised from the bottom. Would think that it would allow more flow through the rock area and then the water would move upward through the chaeto.

here is an attempt to show what im tryin to say
actualy that design would work against ya since you would end up with small fragments of rock chatoe and other things that would eventualy get trapped between the baffles causing a blockage you dont realy need and can be very hard to get out
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just lower baffle D to about 1" above the sand level so water could go through the chaeto and over the sand without disturbing it.

I don't want to have a sandbed in my Fuge because I have sand in my display, plus like Tazzy said disturbed debris could get stuck between the baffles at the base of them.
 
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my thought was that the force of water entering the section would keep that section pretty clear of debris. not sure tho just seems it would allow the rock to filter a little better then just being at the bottom of the fuge.

tazzy695 said:
actualy that design would work against ya since you would end up with small fragments of rock chatoe and other things that would eventualy get trapped between the baffles causing a blockage you dont realy need and can be very hard to get out
 
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