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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Sorry Wayne called you Will. Guess I got caught up in the pics of your sheppard. You think after seeing 1000 posts by you I wouldnt mess up the name. By the way you have your dog trained to attack. That is cool thats the one thing I miss most. I go out of town a bit and it was peice of mind knowing I didnt have to worry about my wife home alone. If you got past baily you could have anything in the house you wanted because the only thing that would have stopped you is a gun. He was a great protecter.:nhl_checking:
 

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Our new rott sheds almost as much as our norwegian elkhound.
But I'll tell you, she is tremendously loyal. Extremely playful. The biggest problem is that she wants to play with every dog she sees, but people tend to interpret her "play growl" for aggression, and avoid us (if you've heard a rottie's real growl, you can tell when it's just a play growl).

IMO, border collies are too smart and too energetic for most homes. Smart dogs with a lot of energy tend to get bored easily, and bored dogs do things you don't want them to.
 

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One thing I would recommend if you are getting a purebred dog- is to research the breed and find out breed behavior tendencies and potential health problems.

I have 2 Australian Shepherds- and they are great dogs- certaintly not for everyone- but very loyal and protective if needed. But they are high energy, and have herding tendencies which have to watched in certain situations.

The bigger the dog- usually the shorter the life span. I can't image getting a puppy and knowing that by 7-8 years old it will be considered a senior and starting to experience health issues/aging. Too heartbreaking for me- as it is way too early- 7-8 should be still in prime for me! That is why I steer clear of the giant breeds- Danes, Berners, Newfies.

I would recommend considering rescue- with breed specific rescue the dogs are often in foster homes and the foster parents really have a feel for the dogs personality and training issues/or non-issues. I think it is easier to be matched for the dog you are looking for this way- and rescues DO get puppies in too.

But if you are looking for a puppy and want to buy from a breeder- research what genetic tendencies the breed can have- eyes problems, hip problems, elbow problems, etc- and choose a breeder that has the breeding dogs certified and rated for these issues. You can certainly get a non-CERF or OFA parent checked puppy cheaper- but if your dog has the health issues associated with the pre-screening- you will end up paying MORE in the end- surgery and monthly meds add up quick!

And if the mother is less than 2 years old- forget it! Most vets do not recommend breeding under 2 years of age and OFA will not certify a dog until it is 2 years old.
 

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here is another thought too

to help you acces the type of dog fits you is there personalitys if you are out going a laid back dog is a bad mix and vise versa while mutt do have some advantages sometimes it is harder to know what you are getting however like I have said before is people read not animals. and like Wayne says there is no substitute for good training. also the trainer I used to train my chocolate lab told me there are two types of dogs democrats and republican seemed kind of funny when he said it then I realized this is a great way to look at breeds. and also knowing how to motivate them or train them.
 

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badfrog5 said:
Border collie is my vote mid size dog they live to please their owner - love everyone ( great kid sitter they will play for hrs with them ) don't shed any worse than any other dog , form what I have read these dogs are the smartest of all domesticated dogs. I do believe that !! Ours is like having a toddler around he dont get his way he pouts like a baby, when his food bowl is empty he will bring it to us as to say i need more food! he does that day or night !

I have had bov desflander <(cant remember how to spell it been to long sense I had them LOL ) to mutts and I must say border collies has been the best !
The Aussies are very similar, don't know if I will ever get anything but. Here is my red tri as a pup 7 years ago.


and one from last Christmas
 

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Got kids? Our Aussie tries to herd the kids. But she is also very protective and will literally get in between my kids and a stranger. Not aggressive. Very loyal. Doesn't bark.
 

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We don't have kids- but our neighbors do- so we switched from invisible fence to chain link fence. When we take them to the dog park they will try to herd other dogs- and even double team to chase down a specific dog.

My Aussies are protective and unless they know the person or we let them know it is OK- they are not happy with strangers in the house. But my petsitter with kids says that the dogs are fine- friendly, active but not protective at her house.

They do love to try to herd the cats though- much to the cats utter disgust.
 

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bottom line

look at your personality the dogs history and personality you are going to be with this dog for at least the next 10-15 years only you know what will make you and your family happy. :victory: that is the main thing if your family is happy then the dog will be happy as well
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Well I lost the Golden Retriever battle. My wife seems to like the
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog. Never heard of it but one of the posts had a similar dog called a bermese mountain dog. We are going to the breeder tonight to see the parents. If anyone has ever had one of these pleas help with advice. This dog is suppose to be super nice but at 130 lbs gets kinda big well see tonight. heres what they look like.
 

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here

sure you are doing reaserch but will post any way and make sure the breeder is listed if not ask why. http://www.gsmdca.org/ and since your wife brought up shedding that should be a main question. here is a couple things I founds from what appears like a very realistic reports on different breeds

A misunderstood breed.
These are very active dogs, and need plenty of activity--they are not laid back like a St. Bernard,Great Dane, or Mastiff. No, they do not drool like a Mastiff or a Saint, but they make a huge mess when they drink. They all will walk away from the water dish with a mouthful of water, which will leave a trail across the floor. Many people pick them because unlike the Bernese, they have short hair. Yes, the hair is shorter, but they shed constantly year-round, and they 'blow-coat' twice a year. Many have a very guardy personality, and will alarm bark for everything--the mailman, the school bus, the garbage man, your husband, even if they have seen that same person jog by every morning for 2 years--they will bark each time he goes by. I have not heard of many families who have successfully owned swissys. Despite some breeders' attempts to project them as 'the perfect family dog,' this is nothing more than a marketing attempt. Due to their guardiness, protectiveness and chase instinct, it is difficult to raise them with children. If you have children, they must be very dog-smart, or this is not the dog for you. Most people I know who own them do not have kids, and I know several breeders who had dogs returned to them because the dog/child relationship just couldn't work out. They require alot of training, and are generally very high maintenance dogs. I have a friend with a mutt, and you can go over there and not even know that the dog is there. If you have a swissy, everyone will know they are there. Lotsa work, but I wouldn't have anything else. not sure after ridding this that this would be the right breed for you at least bares more reserch

here is link with more info

http://www.hoflin.com/BR/Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs

this page list lots of breeds go though them and choose carefully again there is no perfect breed http://www.hoflin.com/BR/BreedReviewsIndex
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Thanks Labman,
I have been doing tons of research. I have heard and read the Bad things but it seems like these are things that can be trained out of them. I was insructed that chasing is something you definatly want to discourage and socialization is very important. In saying this I have not chosen this dog yet. I would like to see him in person as an adult and look into it more. I wasnt aware of the shedding most people seemed to say it was average. I am going to review all the info you have provided so I will have all my questions ready. It was easier picking out a house. Thanks again
 

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I still say

fostering would be the best way to go for you, at the very least you be helping a dog or two get a nice home, and socializing them instead of trapped in the shelter. if you fall in love with a dog all you have to tell the shelter is you decided to adopt it. but in the mean time you get a loving animal and if the dog becomes a problem the shelter is not going to make you continue to foster it. also as the shelter learns what traits etc you like they call you when they have a good foster option. again good for all.
 

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Definitely socialize them if you get them like any dog. We see oh maybe a half a dozen or so Greater Swisses through the clinic and to be honest none have really impressed me. They are all a little timid, not mean in nature just more timid then I would like in a dog. They all do shed a lot, shorter hair then a bermese but still hair. Most of the ones we see were 'show' dogs that did not make it for one reason or another but been in these families since puppies. Big thing with them like all breeds that size is the shorter life span. I would say if you hit 10 years old you are doing well.
 

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we have an austrailian sheppard (red tri) and she is the best dog I have ever owned. Aussies are very loving and loyal and she is amazing with kids. She keeps the neighbor kids off the street! We do pet therapy with her and people love her. She does shed a bit- we brush her outside. Aussies can be high energy, but they are a lot fun. Just buy a frisbee r tennis ball and go to it. Ours does not play with other dogs much just likes people. she does love to play with our treeing walker coonhound though. Our next dog will be a blue or red mearle aussie.
 

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4 frisbee loving dogs!

you need to get one of these I bought one for my dog it's soft flys great dog absolutely loves it she completely shredded it after about a year lol but it's great this is the best deal i have found on them. just ordered a replacement

Infinity Frisbee by Wham-o
http://www.onlinefitness.com/product.cfm?pr=1761

 

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One of my neighbors has a Greater Swiss Mountain dog. He is HUGE! She walks by with him alot and seems like he wouldn't be the "playing" type of dog. He seems a little slow and goofy. I don't know if it's just him or all of them because of their size but it seems when he walks he has a dip in his back which looks like a horse that's been ridden too much. He's kinda come out of his shell with me and my kids but is very timid.

One dog noone has mentioned is a Labradoodle. We have one and he does shed some but only about half of what my golden retriever did. He has all the good qualities of the Poodle and Lab...very intelligent and yet playful and loyal. Some people hear "labradoodle" and think prissy but let me tell you, there is nothing prissy about him...he weighs 95 lbs. They are expensive to buy from a breeder. We were fortunate enough to have found him on petfinders.com. Just wanted to throw out another breed at you..lol :shout:
 

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covered that breed before

I know you will hate this but they are a high priced mutt. it takes a long time before you can create a new breed and have steady temperaments and standers the breed is not acceppted by any group other then there own no country or other club has made them a breed so paying $800 bucks for a mutt imo is ridicule's i hate this new designer dog term they make breeding sound so easy. they do show promise though it will just be allot longer.

http://michiganreefers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=63924&highlight=labradoodle
 
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