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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Does anyone know what type of algae this is on my sand? We have been trying to get rid of it for a while now and would like to know the main source so we can stop it.

Also, in the short term, would a lawnmower blenny eat this kind?

Thanks,
David
 

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Do you have any nassarius snails or anything stirring up the sand bed. If not, you could be getting some nitrogen build up in the sand, which is allowing the algae to grow. I have seen this in my own tank... just last night, in fact, I did a sand vacuum to try and remove as much of the nitrogenous compounds as possible and to re-aerate the sand bed. Apparently my snails are either 1) gone or 2) severely depleted. Probably time for a sand sifting starfish. I hear they are very good at keeping the sand bed aerated. However, they can be somewhat harmful in a small tank as they consume beneficial bacteria as well. Anyway, try the sand vac and see how it turns out. Should help quite a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for reply. I tried to upload the pic again but can't get it larger. I will have to try a different way.

I only have a couple snails and definitely need more. What kind of vacuum do you use? I have one of the siphon vacs but it won't lift any of the algae out of the water.
 

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Stirring up your sand could cause it to cycle and creating problems. How old is your tank? It could be new tank syndrome, nutrient problems.....what are your parameters, what is your filtration, skimmer, flow, sump, micro algae, etc? Water change habits, what type of water are you using....list goes on and on
 

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I just use a regular siphon vacuum. You might want to try siphoning off the algae first with a regular hose (no fat end) just to get rid of it. Maybe try that first and see how it goes. The prior post is correct... if you have a small tank, then vacuuming the substrate may lead to a mini-cycle which would be annoying. If it's a large tank and you have lots of live rock, it shouldn't be a problem. Plus, this isn't something you would do often at all.

Another consideration is the water going into your tank. You should test your tap water to see what the nutrient concentration is (the LFS would do this for you). If you can get a reverse osmosis system, that usually takes care of any problems associated with tap water. And you can find some used ones here for relatively cheap. They are worth the money.

Finally, make sure that if you're using filter sleeves/pads that you change those out frequently as they can lead to increased levels of nitrogen compounds.

Lots to consider but try one thing at a time so you can figure out what the problem is and avoid it in the future.
 
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