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Nitrate is btween 5.0 and 10 is a Bio-Pellet Reactor good idea

is a Bio-Pellet Reactor good idea my nirate is betwen 10 and 5.0 and ph at 8.2
whats the pros and cons
 

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I have been researching hardcore bio pellets their use and pros/cons. A lot of people report that the bio pellets do too good of a job at stripping nutrients from your tank.

So while this does a great job at removing no3 and po4 from your tank it can sometimes do too good of a job and there are other issues as well i will cover in a min.

Con:
Bio pellets dont know when to stop working and will remove all no3 and po4 from your tank. This is a mixed blessing it seems to me that you want to lower it without removing it. Removing it seems to cause cyano issues according to a lot of posts I've read.

Con 2:
It adds another form of nutrient to the tank as a byproduct of the bacteria breaking down your no3 and po4. This needs to be skimmed out or you are gonna be in the same boat with lots of algae blooms from what i understand.

All of that was to get to a point. The reef dynamics Bio Reactor seems is the one I am going with.

It has a unique approach to recirculating the water in the reactor so you can keep the media suspended without pulling and pushing tons of water through it. Meaning you can dial it in to lower and not completely remove your no3 and po4.

The next part to me seems to be getting that byproduct of the biopellets out of your system. To do that I plan on putting a T fitting on the end of my input to the skimmer with the bottom side down so that the output of my bioreactor goes through the skimmer before getting back into my tank.

I dunno if I am just drinking the coolaid but to me this seems to be the best option I have seen for bio pellets and solve most of the issues with using them.

Here is a link that has some videos that can probably explain it better than I am:
http://www.reefdynamics.com/ProductD...PR250&CartID=1
 

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Pros

When I started using bio-pellets I did notice after 6 weeks that the tank was crystal clear and the skimmer was overloaded with crap and stink. This allowed me to take my GFO reactor off line with is not only a power savings but a savings on the eye popping costs of GFO. With such pristine water a lot of my nescience corals like xania and anthelia started to decline which I thought was another benefit as they grow at a rate to take over your tank what I mean about decline is not to kill but limit the growth keeping it in check. With those corals in check along with the healthier fish more colorful than ever I was able to add more fish and increase feeding up to 5 Xs a day. All of this while moving my 10% water changes from weekly to monthly.

Does it feed nescience bacteria like cyno? Sure it designed to feed bacteria. I have not been into reefing longer than a year or so however I have not had an outbreak with cyno with three big tanks. This is by following simple practices such as moderate feeding, good water movement, and water changes. But if you have cyno then you have other problems and need to solve that issue before you can graduate to a pristine tank with biopellets.

IMO Biopellets is a must if your looking for a clean costeffective reefing expreience.
 

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If you have mostly softies i wouldnt recommend bio pellets. like someone mentioned about it can strip your tank completly of nutrients and softies are not a nutrient free coral. Sps system i highly recommend it. I purchased one from a lfs and seen awsome results in the clarity and amount of p04, with your levels being so high it sounds like a new setup. if thats the case i would allow for those levels to begin there natral cycle and drop on there own, of course that is if you have proper filtration nice amount of live rock/live sand. Do some nice size water changes, then after some time invest in some biopellets.
 

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ive been running biopellets for, i think 5 weeks now, i am starting to see some changes, my corals are getting bigger, faster. my nitrate and phosphates have dropped from 40 to 5, my phosphates are reading close to zero, although i have some macro to keep that in check. and water clarity is up up up! my display looks amazing and i owe it to my new reacotrs.
you nitrates arent bad. you cant expect them to be 0 all the time, because your fish are going to poop sooner or later. i personally i wouldnt make any changes.
 

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Con:
Bio pellets dont know when to stop working and will remove all no3 and po4 from your tank. This is a mixed blessing it seems to me that you want to lower it without removing it. Removing it seems to cause cyano issues according to a lot of posts I've read.
Cyano is a natural occurring bacteria and can form just like any other bacteria in an aquarium or in natural sea or fresh water. Since the pellets are a food source for bacteria once cyano naturally occurs in the aquarium the pellets will fuel its growth. to lower the risk of cyano or other nuisance bacteria entering your system its common for people running reactor to add competing bacteria such as microbacter7 to the system. Over doing the amount of any carbon source (bio-pellets) often leads to bacterial growth on the surface areas of the system in the form of colorless algae which is actually colonies of bacteria.
Con 2:
It adds another form of nutrient to the tank as a byproduct of the bacteria breaking down your no3 and po4. This needs to be skimmed out or you are gonna be in the same boat with lots of algae blooms from what i understand.
Not another nutrient but the same bacteria I explained above is taking place in the reactor on the surface of the pellets. The bacteria is what is consuming the PO4 and NO3. As the pellets tumble the bacteria that is consuming the nutrients sheds off and by having the skimmer and output of the reactor close the bacteria is skimmed off exporting most of the nutrients. You don't have to worry about skimming it all as your corals will use the bacteria as food. Before using pellets I would recommend going +2 on your skimmer for the reason stated above and to add oxygen back to the water as the bacteria will lower oxygen levels in the water which then can lead to PH swings and whatnot.

It has a unique approach to recirculating the water in the reactor so you can keep the media suspended without pulling and pushing tons of water through it. Meaning you can dial it in to lower and not completely remove your no3 and po4.
This seems to be where the new design for bio pellet reactors are going to keep the bacteria in the reactor rather where it belongs and using a small tubing for the output makes the mod to a skimmer simple rather then the designed of most upflow reactors that have been on the market for the past couple years.
 

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I ordered my reef dynamics reactor on 1/16 and still waiting for it to ship. Getting really anxious to set it up and give it a try.
 

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i agree a lot with soverjas. i dose with microbacter7 and my cyano has nearly disappeared as it was present before starting the reactor. also my output goes in my skimmers general direction but not directly into the skimmer as the product of biopellets can be consumed by both coral and microbacter7 ( and also harmful bacteria too, but thats why i add competing bacteria, so harmful bacteria struggles to survive in the tank).

my research has led me to believe that PHA (what biopellets are made out of) is a substance that bacteria produce in a time of excess nitrogen. they do this because they want to store the nitrogen for time when it is not plentyful. when nitrogen is bound to PHA other organism will utilize it (corals). if you add microbacter7 they will use so much of it and other nutrients that organisms with similar dietary requirements will die off (Cyano). also it makes an easy skimmate, allowing you to easily remove your nitrogenous wastes from the system.

biopellets make a good way to lower nitrates because it does so many different things, from changing nitrogenous materials into useful compounds for the rest of the tank, and ultimately leading to the removal of nitrogenous substances from the tank.

please correct me if im wrong at any point, i know alot of people misunderstand biopellets. many think that biopellets, or the reactor itself is a medium for bacteria, which i would disagree with entirely as it is not a suitable environment any bacteria with the amount of agitation the biopellets require.

but again, your nitrates aren't bad enough to need biopellets.
 

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you don't have to necessarily tumble, spin or agate the pellets but they will clump together giving less surface area for bacteria to form on. Without constant agitation the microscopic bacteria will quickly multiply and form colonies of bacteria. You want be able to remove them while they are just a film so that you are not releasing large numbers of bacteria into the system at once. When pellets first came out people where taking small pales and just putting them in there sumps with no agitation. Then they found out after then disturbing them once colonies where able to form that the colonies actually had large numbers of die off causing nutrient levels to rise.
 

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Cyano is a natural occurring bacteria and can form just like any other bacteria in an aquarium or in natural sea or fresh water. Since the pellets are a food source for bacteria once cyano naturally occurs in the aquarium the pellets will fuel its growth. to lower the risk of cyano or other nuisance bacteria entering your system its common for people running reactor to add competing bacteria such as microbacter7 to the system. Over doing the amount of any carbon source (bio-pellets) often leads to bacterial growth on the surface areas of the system in the form of colorless algae which is actually colonies of bacteria.
Great info I think you said it alot better than I did but I did want to comment on the above post and get your input.

This is just something I read but the author said that Cyano thrives in systems with low no3 because they can pull nitrogen from the atmosphere. Meaning in super low nutrient environments it's the most problematic because it can spread without competition. Phosphate reduction is a good way to attack it so running GFO in combination of your bio pellets would help reduce the risk of cyano outbreaks.

Seemed logical to me, if i have no algae cause I'm taking all the nutrients out of the water and there is a type that can get nutrients by other means they would have free roam over the tank.

Again not sure how accurate it is, but if you look at forums there are tons of people with bio pellets that complain about cyano outbreaks.
 

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Great info I think you said it alot better than I did but I did want to comment on the above post and get your input.

This is just something I read but the author said that Cyano thrives in systems with low no3 because they can pull nitrogen from the atmosphere. Meaning in super low nutrient environments it's the most problematic because it can spread without competition. Phosphate reduction is a good way to attack it so running GFO in combination of your bio pellets would help reduce the risk of cyano outbreaks.

Seemed logical to me, if i have no algae cause I'm taking all the nutrients out of the water and there is a type that can get nutrients by other means they would have free roam over the tank.

Again not sure how accurate it is, but if you look at forums there are tons of people with bio pellets that complain about cyano outbreaks.
I agree with that and currently run both. In the pic you will see my pellet reactor by my skimmer and my gfo reactor in my return section. My current reactor is the JNS reactor.
-checkthisout
 

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my cyano outbreaks were worst when my nitrates were at 40ppm. although i am running gfo in a reactor now along with my biopellets.
do you have a link to the publication that said they thrive in low nitrate environments?
are your sure they didnt mean nitrite? i dont think anything really enjoys nitrite lol.
 

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my cyano outbreaks were worst when my nitrates were at 40ppm. although i am running gfo in a reactor now along with my biopellets.
do you have a link to the publication that said they thrive in low nitrate environments?
are your sure they didnt mean nitrite? i dont think anything really enjoys nitrite lol.
I looked it up yesterday just to make sure before i posted but I will have to find it again, but the point I think is not the nitrites. We are talking about bio pellets which are lowering your nitrates and phosphates. Again i'm no expert but the way I understand it is algae needs nitrates and phosphates. Bio Pellets reduce Nitrates faster than Phosphates.

So for example in a zero nitrate environment which is doable with bio pellets you still may have phosphates. 1 of the two things required to grow algae, cyano is different than a lot of algaes cause it can take nitrogen from the environment that contain compounds used as nutrients and that combined with the phosphates means its the only algae you can grow or that has no competition. So running GFO along with your Bio Pellets to remove the phosphates is one method of battling the cyano in a zero no3 environment.

Another method that is actually better from what I understand is not to completely remove nitrates and phosphates from your system but to lower them. This is better for the corals who actually need no3 and po4.

And that was the point of the original post. The Reef Dynamics bio reactor is the only one that I am aware of that lets you keep the media suspended while also providing a method to restrict the flow through the reactor. So if you process less water you wont completely remove the no3 and po4 you will just lower it. I am sure other companies will follow their lead but I haven't seen another reactor yet that does it.

There are also huge threads about this out on reef central. For more info on Cyanobacteria and nitrogen look up nitrogen fixation the way I understand it is cyano when in environments that have low or no no3 can combine ammonia NH3 and Nitrites NO2 to make a protein that is a usable food source.

Again everything I am saying here is just how I understand it.
 

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You can just dose vodka or the more preferred vinegar to achive the same results as the pellets (all three are just carbon sources) and it's easier to adjust your dose than how many pellets/flow rates and no reactors needed.

I personally have had very good results with vinegar.
 

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?

You can just dose vodka or the more preferred vinegar to achive the same results as the pellets (all three are just carbon sources) and it's easier to adjust your dose than how many pellets/flow rates and no reactors needed.

I personally have had very good results with vinegar.
Dosent vinegar significantly lower your PH?
 

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You can just dose vodka or the more preferred vinegar to achive the same results as the pellets (all three are just carbon sources) and it's easier to adjust your dose than how many pellets/flow rates and no reactors needed.

I personally have had very good results with vinegar.
I have read a lot of people saying the same. I just haven't gotten a grasp on the vinegar dosing yet and how it works. Do you just dump it in the tank every so often or you use a doser. With the bio pellets i get there are bacteria there and thats their home and they are always working.. with vinegar dosing I cant picture how it all works yet.. I will do more research there next.
 
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