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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How can I stop these critters from spreading like wildfire? I have had aiptasia and they've never spread like these critters. I've been managing them with a zapper so far, but keep popping up. My concern is they will get into places that I can not see. Nothing will eat them, correct?

I read having a pristine tank can help. Unfortunately, mine is far from that because I haven't been very good about doing water changes. Would that seriously help? If so, how frequently would I need to do 10 gallon water changes to turn this around? I have a 65 gallon tank with a 25 gallon sump.
 

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Can you take out the rock they're on? If so, take it out, sprinkle some salt on them. You will see them release from the rock, then wipe them away. Be sure to rinse off the rock in saltwater before you return it to your tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wouldn't they hide in their holes if you remove the rock from the water? Thus, I'm thinking I would have to guess where they are after I take the rock out of the water. I also have some mushrooms on many of the rocks they have been popping out on.

Does putting salt directly on them burn them and how would that salt affect nearby mushrooms?
 

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You have to be careful to get it just on the mojanos. You can get it in the holes too. You just have to remember where they are if your rock is really porous and they hide.

I'm assuming it burns them, they release right away - we used to do this for leaches at the lake when I was a kid - much better than ripping the hook out!
 

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While manual removal can certainly reduce the populations of Majano , we find that a 2 prong approach is much more successful at fully eradicating these pests. Another option for dealing with them manually is using something like Aiptasia X by Red Sea. There are several similar products out there, but from our experience the Red Sea one is the best as it doesn't tend to clump up like other similar items, and it also comes with some really handy applicator attachments. This is however only 1/2 of the solution. Inevitably there will be a scrap of a majano left over or one you just can't reach, or a rock you just can't get to. That's why we always include a predator of some kind as well. For several years, we didn't have a predator option for Majano. Upon going to one of the MASM conferences back when they were at the Weber's Inn, one of the speakers presented a filefish - Acreichthys tomentosus. (I may have the genus spelled wrong, but it's close.) This filefish has at least 9 times out of 10 eaten up all the majano in even larger aquaria. We had one clean up hundreds of majano out of a 300g reef at the shop. They do come with some risk as the filefish may eat zoanthid polyps as well, but this has only been an occasional problem.

Similar two prong approaches with Aiptasia X or something similar combined with a predator work quite well with Aiptasia as well. For Aiptasia, predators include peppermint shrimp, copperbanded butterflies, to name the two most commonly used.

We'll generally be successful with either of the above techniques without removing at rock from the tank for cleaning. Removing the rock can however be a good jump start on the way to employing solutions like those above.

As a final note, whenever you're dealing with pests like Majano or Aiptasia, it's worth looking at what factors about the environment are encouraging their growth. That is making the environment in your reef preferable to Majano or Aiptasia. Both of these organisms need to capture a lot of food to reach plague proportions, so their very existence in large numbers means there's likely a feeding problem of some kind. We'll generally suggest when feeding meaty items, like mysis shrimp, brine shrimp, pellets etc, that the food is put in the tank very slowly, just a few shrimp or pellets at a time. As the fish eat the first few shrimp (generally within 1 second of it hitting the water) then put in a few more. We'll continue to do this for a few minutes, or as appropriate for the population of fish in the aquarium. The key is that the food hits the water, and is in the belly of the fish as quickly as possible. This rules out the possibility that food is swirling around the tank, going behind the rocks, and eventually feeding Majano or Aiptasia. This is only part of the puzzle, but when proper feeding technique is combined with the two prong approach above, that's where success in getting rid of the problem is. For fish that live in the subtrate like gobies and jawfish, we'll bring the food to them by feeding them with a small baster or feeding syringe.

Hope you find the above information helpful!

Steve
 

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another good way to kill them is to make a paste out of kalkwasser and put it in a syringe without a needle. Put the tip carefully in front of the majano, then squirt a bad out into the base/mouth area. It will close on the paste. Then put a thin coat and just let it sit for a day or two. You may have to do this several times, but it does kill them over time. Cjeap and easy, just requires constant attention.
 

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^ Awesome comment! Glad to see you're very humble!!!! Back to the topic Majanos are annoying Take the rock out and dry it out. Only thing I've done that has worked. Also the cheapest way :victory:
 
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