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So rather then getting a zapper I thought I would try using aptashia x from red sea who I have always like there products. came with a syringe that had two different types of needles that could be screwed on for reaching hard to reach aptashia. I had a few thats disk where larger then a silver dollar and stood several inches tall. I followed the instruction and the stuff worked great. I was surprised how well it worked which is why I am posting this thread. This product gets a A+ from me. Only thing it didn't have in the instructions that I did differently is I did it only a few hours before I was ready to perform my water change. If something went wrong I could have done the water change right away so my recommendation would be to use it before a water change so you have water ready to go in case of an emergency.
 

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in my experience it works great at first, but, it slowly doesn't work. I'm assuming they just get used to it, and don't consume it anymore. Also, sometimes when they "die" they just break into pieces then turn into a few little baby ones.
 

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Works really well but I ended up having two new patches to treat. Been free of it ever since. Cleared two tanks up with it.
 

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I didn't have good luck with that stuff! Most of the Aiptasias I tried to kill would die, but I kept having a bunch of little ones pop up a few days later. I got Peppermints and they worked much better. How many days has it been since you used it?
 

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This is no joke, but I have zillions of green implosions in my tank, and they'll eat aiptasia if it grows too close. Problem is the green implosions are now becoming a nuisance, and while they sting as bad as aiptasia they irritate nearby corals. My peppermint won't even look at aiptasia. Too busy stealing food from my Acans.

Anyways, I've had decent luck with Aiptasia-X or Joes-Juice in the past, but I've had a bit better luck with plain vinegar and an insulin syringe.

Aiptasia are quick to retreat, but I've had some that just get cranky when hit with Aiptasia-X / Joe's juice and never die even after multiple hits. However, vinegar and a syringe seems to always work *if* you can get some acid inside them.
 

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Lemon concentrate and a syringe has always worked good for me, but you got to get it in them before they deflate which is probably true of all the products.

I think I heard peppermints were better at eating small ones and didn't usually eat the larger ones.
 

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Of all the similar items on the market, we like aiptasia-X the best as well. You get more solution for your $ than with the others, the applicator syringes are much nicer, and it doesn't seem to coagulate like the others and clog the syringe.

The key to remember when using these items is that multi-pronged approach is much more effective than any one method. See below.

Our favorite for most tanks is using Aiptasia-X or something similar to knock down the big ones, which yes will likely create many, many more small ones, so something like Aiptasia-X is seldom going to be successful by itself.

That's where the next prong in the attack comes in - a predator like peppermint shrimp, copperbanded butterfly etc. While you knock out the big ones with the Aiptasia-X, the predators are eating the littlest ones, and the ones in the nooks and crannies that you just can't reach.

Finally, we really watch our feeding. This doesn't necessarily mean we feed less, but simply more efficiently. For example, for feeding the fish, we put in a couple individual mysis shrimp, and BAM, BAM, the fish eat them. Everybody else looks up like, 'Where's our food?!' and we put in a couple more shrimp. We continue to do this for a few minutes, only as the fish are nailing the food as fast as it hits the water. If any at all is getting past the fish, then there's too much food going in too fast. Any of this food past the fish is potentially captured by the aiptasia encouraging their growth and making the problem harder to control. For bottom dwelling fish like gobies and jawfish, we bring the food to them with a turkey baster or long syringe.

Steve
 

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steve's got it! From my understanding the guy is a pro. I've been needing to make a trip to Lansing to preuss

My experience with aiptasia x is similar to those of the others here. It eliminated it initially. About a week after a small aiptasia appeared in the same spot. I treated it again and it hasn't been seen since.
 

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Good to know all that has been posted here. I just discovered an Aiptasia in my tank. It just appeared and I started this tank in early January. I'm headed to Preuss later today. Fortunately, the bugger is highup on the rock and readily accessible. It's about the size of a dime and looks pretty robust. We'll see how this goes.
 
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