Michigan Reefers banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a clam in my tank (for about 3wks now.) He is doing good as far as I know. I have him placed at the bottom of my tank in the sand. Everyday or two he is on his side more then standing up. So I go and stand him back up cause I heard the bottom should not be exposed. Is this true, should I try burying him really deep in the sand or just let him be? I do not think it is a light issue(like trying to seek more/less light) cause the movement happens at night when the lights are out. Any advice would be appreciated-Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
768 Posts
Small clams are supposed to be on a solid surface so they can attach themselves. If you really like the look of the clam on the sand, put it on a rock until you are sure its attached, them bury the rock that its on it the sand. What lighting do you have? T5s or MHs are definatly required to keep clams.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a phoenix 250wt MH 14k bulb which runs for 6 hrs a day 2 hours before mh run and during and 2hrs after mh shut down I have a 65 wt blue actinic pc bulb. The clam is about 5-6 inches. How do I go about attaching it to a rock?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Clams

I have clams under VHO's for several years now. It depends on the type of clam and how deep your tank is. MH are the best, but I wouldn't say you have to have them based on my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
768 Posts
I'm pretty sure that you find a nice snug spot on a rock and let it sit there. They have a special little organ or appendage on the underside, and it attaches them to the rock. If I can remember correctly, it makes these fiber things, which then harden, and sort of cement it to the rock. There was an article in one of the aquarium magazines that I got a while back. Then when the clam is biggger, they usually just rely on thier wieght to keep them in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
768 Posts
Ok I found the article. The attachment structure is called the byssus. The organ that makes the liquid which then turns into the hardened fibers is called the byssal organ. It also says it is best to place the clam onto something hard like live rock, so it can naturally attach itself. It also states that when placed on a hard surface, it olny takes a few days for them to attach. Many sspecies stop using the byssus when they reach a certain size due to thier wieght like I said before. Its also important to make sure when you put the clam on the hard surface that it can easily fully open itself and also plan for the future when the clam will increase in size.

You know that you really should do extensive research before you buy something like this so you know ahead of time all of its care requirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Deresa prefer the sandbed, while crocea and maxima prefer the rockwork. You may need to prop it up for a few days with a piece of rubble or set it in a crevice where it has some support until it gets firmly attached. Make sure it has room to open though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Leaving certain clams in the sand without letting them attach to something solid can leave them vulnerable to parasites or predators through the unattached gland on the bottom. It took my clam a few days to attach to the live rock (actually fell over a few times). Once attached, the clam tilted / rotated toward the light until it was comfortable. After that, it thrived. Mine was a crocea.

Good luck,

Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Hopefully this will help clarify some things:

tridacna is the genus and not all tridacna are found commonly found in sand in nature. Species Derasa, Gigas and to a lesser extent squamosa are not generally found on rocks (squamosa being borderline). Previous posts are correct in some attach at a young age to help brace themselves for food etc. but then detach and typically rest in the sand.

The species Crocea and Maxima are typically found in rocks with crocea being found exclusively in rocks.

The advice will ultimately depend on the species of clam you have. If it's a crocea and you want it in the sand I would suggest burying a piece of rubble rock or half clam shelf below it and allow the clam to burrow down same advice would also be true for a maxima. If it's a derasa or gigas I would write it off as that the way the clam wants it.

Lastly, clams can attach in a matter of hours depending on stress and strength. Since it's new 2-3 days is probably a pretty good estimate.

Hope that helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
I know I am a few days late on this thread but I just recently picked up a maxima (about 1" length) and while doing some reading on general care, acclimation etc. I found one article talking about taking a small piece of rubble rock (could use a small shell or a piece of a terra cotta pot too I would guess) and placing just under the sand where you want the clam to stay in your sand bed. Once the rubble is in place, just set the clam over the rock and it will attach. I did this for my maxima and it has yet to fall over.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top