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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay. So ive done alot of reading about raising brine shrimp to adulthood over past few weeks. I only have one tank so i wont be raising alot. I want to know.if anyone has any tricks for raising them. But i understand all the basics.

Also i wanted to ask. Is 5 gal enough to raise them to adult hood. I wanted to take a 10 gal and partition it so i can raise brine at different ages so i will have nice fat ones more frequently.
 

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I'm assuming you plan to decapsulate the eggs?

I've been buying adult brine shrimp at a LFS and keep them in a 5 gallon with a sponge filter. No heater. They stay at room temperature which is 72 for me. The tank is full of hydroids now. These can be a problem depending on who you plan to feed them too. Decapsulating the eggs will prevent this from happening if you hatch your own.

I place some of the adults in a bottle for 2 hours with either some green water or selcon (or equivalent) to enrich them before feeding. I assume you already know they have very little nutritional value by themselves. You have to gut load them.

I've been hatching baby brine shrimp for a couple weeks now with limited success. I use fresh saltwater at 1.018, decapsulate the eggs and let them rip on a bubbler, again at room temp (72). It seems to take 2+ days for them to start hatching. I believe if I raise the temp to 78 they would hatch quicker. But I'm not sure how to easily raise the temp of an inverted pepsi bottle. Also I think my eggs are old and I would get better hatch results with new eggs.

You could actually get a large tubs, cover them, heat them, expose them to light, add eggs and saltwater and they would just about be self sustaining. I'm trying to find a you tube video I saw about this.

Are you planning on hatching directly in a 5ga tank? That was my next step to try and hatch them in a 10ga directly. Easier to control the temperature with a heater than way.

Tom
 

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Here you go. This guy hatches them outside in 2 tubs. No reason you couldn't do this inside. But keep in mind, if you don't keep the culture sterile, disease and pests (like hydriods) will creep up.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks, already watched that video. i planed on hatching in a mason jar, like im doing now. and then adding them to one of the 5 gal partitions of the 10 gal aquarium. if i ever had a problem with hydroids i would just drain the affected partition and let it dry for a few days. i still plan on feeding my homemade frozen diet and the occasional flake food. so it wont be required of me to have both partitions up and running all the time. also i did plan on putting them in an overdose solution of green water to pack full of goodies before feeding. i already supplement my tank with it for my many inverts.
 

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Why not just hatch them in the mason jar and just keep adding them to the 5gallon? What's the partition for?

If you decapsulate the brine, then hydroids are not a problem. So far my tanks with high flow, the hydroids don't seem to be an issue. It's the low flow tanks they can really take off. At least that's my experience so far in feeding them.

I'm very interested in your experience with hatching brine. I'd like to increase my hatch rate right now and increase the size of the batches. Eventually it would be nice to grow them out full size.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
my experience right now is about 24 hours and counting. ( still waiting for the eggs to hatch)

i am not familar with decapsulating the eggs. if you could. please explain?

the partition is so that while waiting for one batch to become full size i can already get started on another. so i can get a little cycle going.
 

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There's a shell around the egg. After hatching you let everything settle and the shell rises to the top and you drain the live bbs from the bottom. The brine expands energy breaking out of the shell too. The shells can pollute your water, so you generally don't want to add them to your tank.

So to get rid of the shell you decap them. First bubble the eggs in tap water or RO water for 10 minutes to re-hydrate the egg. Then bubble the eggs in bleach for 4-5 minutes. This will dissolve the shell. You will see the eggs turn a bright orange when the shell dissolves. After this you rinse the eggs in tap water and a little dechlorinate solution and what you have left is decapsulted eggs. The chlorine kills any hydroids cysts that may be on the shell. I'm still playing with the chlorine bleach solution mix. I don't like to use it straight up. But you can.

You can actually decap a weeks supply of eggs (maybe more) and keep them in the fridge and hatch only what you needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i was planning on just separating the shrimp and the shells by collecting the shrimp at the bottom with a light. then simming the surface to rid my hatching solution of the shells. then dump them into the 5 gal partition to grow up.

is this good enough or should i still do the bleach method i just watched?
 

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For me decaping the eggs is important to get rid of dried hydroids on the shells. I plan on feeding them to dwarf seahorses and hydroids can be a major problem for them. As I mentioned the adults I purchased are in a 5ga and that tank is filled with tiny little hydroids. These hydroids will compete for food and probably kill the baby brine shrimp. So that's a big plus for decapping - to keep hydroids out of your grow out tank.

I also like the idea of decapping a large bunch of eggs and keeping them in the fridge until I need to hatch them. ready to go. Some guy on ebay sells bottles of decapped eggs ready to hatch. I may try some of his product in the future.

It's suppose to be easier for the decapped eggs to hatch and you get a better hatch rate I guess. Is it a big deal? Not really sure.

By the way, once you start a tank, they'll start breeding and in theory you won't have to buy eggs all the time. You can seem them mating and the gravid female swimming around with eggs all the time. They'll drop those eggs which will hatch in the grow out tank.

I need to raise my temp to 78, put them under direct light for the first 24 hours and see if my hatch time and rate get better. Also remember hatching is very PH sensitive. You must be above 8.0 (I think).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
well, right now i dont plan on having the setup running continuously for long periods. so im unsure if im going to decap with bleach. i checked this morning and 50% of my eggs have hatched (36 hours). also im not feeding directly to fry or anything, they will be hatched, go straight into the grow out tank, then scoped up with a net, gut loaded and fed to the fish. so im not too worried about the fish accidentally eating the capsule.
 
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