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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our well Water is VERY HARD. We even have a water softner and in our sinks and tub if we dont clean regularly we get major rust stains. When I was on the phone with spectra-pure he had me go in the back of my toilet where the water chamber is. I lifted the lid and everything in the back of my tiolet was stained rust. He hadme run my finger along the water line and tell him what it felt like. I did this and it was real slimly. He told me that I have a bacteria problem and my well needs to be shocked. I did call around and to have my well shocked its $1000. I would LOVE a rodi system. I am going to call around monday to a different company and see what they say. Plus my wells psi is only around 45-50 and that means I would need a booster which is around $250. Please if someone is using a unit with well water tell me if you like it. I dont like going to the LFS weekley for water would rather make my own. Im going for the 0TDS. Can I get that from an rodi unit?
 

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Well, I have a well and also got tired of the hard water stuff and hauling water. We went through Mid West Water for a softner then a Ro unit. My TDS went from like 65 down to 5 on a bad day. Now I'm trying to figure out how to hook up a Di unit to it to get down to 0 tds.

Not sure on our PSI as I wasnt home when this stuff was installed but I get RO water whenever I need it:victory:
 

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Hmm that's interesting I did a quick search and found this

Chemical treatment

For several reasons, routine chemical disinfectants that effectively wipe out other bacteria are only modestly successful against iron bacteria. Iron bacteria build up in thick layers forming a slime that keeps disinfectants from penetrating beyond the surface cells. In addition, miner iron dissolved in water can absorb much of the disinfectants before they reach the bacterial cells. Also, because chemical reactions are slowed at the cool temperatures common in wells, bacterial cells need a long exposure to the chemical for treatment to be effective. Even if chlorine kills all the bacterial cells in the water, those in the groundwater can be drawn in by pumping or drift back into the well.

Because of these factors, thoroughly treating an iron bacteria infestation requires more than simply dumping chlorine into the well. The following steps are recommended:

Prepare the chlorine solution.
Approximately 8 quarts of 5.25% (or 5 qts. of 10%) chlorine bleach such as Hylex, Chlorox, etc., should be mixed with 100 gals. of water. It is best to prepare an amount more than the amount of water standing in the well, and the 100-gal. measure is a safe estimate if this is not known. Most garbage cans hold 30 gals. or more, so that filling three (clean, of course) cans with the solution is sufficient.
Pour or pump the solution into the well in one continuous flow. Attach a hose to a faucet and, making certain the hose itself is clean, place the other end of the hose into the well. Open the faucet and recirculate for one hour the now-chlorinated water, washing down the inside of the casing and the pump piping. Faucets in your house should be opened until you detect a chlorine smell, then close them.
Allow the chlorine solution to remain in the well and piping for at least 24 hours, preferably longer. The system should then be purged free of chlorine. Since it can disrupt a septic system, the chlorinated water should be run outdoors, perhaps into a ditch. It may also kill grass and shrubs, and should not be run into a lake or stream.
Well owners may need to repeat this process more than once. If indications of iron bacteria persist, a water sample should be analyzed by a laboratory. Collect the sample only when the system is completely free of the chlorine smell.

Source: Iron Bacteria

My water is very hard too but no presence of rust just everything else sky high and I go through di resin probably a little quicker but still get a few hundred gallons (0 tds for the first half and 1 tds for the rest of the time) with one full size cartridge of brs nuclear grade resin but I plan to switch to Spectrapure's maxcap system next. People who have switched are getting a thousand gallons at least.

A brand new ro booster pump runs $70-100 check eBay and is not a necessarily must have but you won't be waiting as long to get some water made and your membrane will perform a little better as in tds numbers before the di cartridge.
 

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i use a simple 4 stage ro/di unit with my very hard well water, and i am doing just fine. been about 6 months, and you can really see the difference. although i do not have a tds meter. if you have well water. you need this if you want to keep up to date on those water changes and top offs. otherwise, you're just doing way to much work.
 

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good deal, don't forget you can always buy one from your LFS and support a small business. i love my LFS try to do everything through them and pretty much cost the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I really do support my LFS and was there today and for a 25 GPD 3 stage they wanted $60 more dollars than a 5 stage 75GPD from bulkreefsupply. I dont mind spending a few extra dollars like all my livestock including corals I get from my lfs. I just cant justify $60.
 

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I have the 5 stage from brs and am having good luck except for going thru di resin pretty fast. I'm probably getting about 100g per cartridge. My water hardness is 29 before the water softener. I get 0tds with this setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have the 5 stage from brs and am having good luck except for going thru di resin pretty fast. I'm probably getting about 100g per cartridge. My water hardness is 29 before the water softener. I get 0tds with this setup.
That is great! I am ordering now!!!
 

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Oh forgot to mention my well pressure goes from 40-55 ish and I do not have a booster pump. I've thought about it but everything has been working great without so I just keep buying corals instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thats good to hear because I think my pressure is low like around 50. I just ordered the 5 stage unit from Brs and a tds meter. Can't wait!

Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX using Tapatalk
 

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A brand new ro booster pump runs $70-100 check eBay and is not a necessarily must have but you won't be waiting as long to get some water made and your membrane will perform a little better as in tds numbers before the di cartridge.
I'd recommend you think twice about going for a cut rate booster pump...
 

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Should you get a booster pump?

Booster pumps make an incredible difference in the performance of RO systems.
Increased pressure dramatically increases the speed at which your RO membrane will produce purified water, and higher pressures result in RO water with lower TDS - which will increase the life span of your DI resin.

How much faster will a system with a booster pump produce water? Here's a couple of scenarios (from the calculator on our home page) as an example:
-75 gpd membrane at 38 psi and 65 degrees F water will produce 43 gpd, or 1.8 gph.
-75 gpd membrane at 80 psi and 65 degrees F water will produce 101 gpd, or 4.2 gph!

Here's some of our test data that illustrates the effect of increased pressure on rejection rate (the higher the rejection rate the more pure the RO water will be and the longer your DI resin will last):


We've been getting a lot of questions lately regarding how best to set up booster pumps and all the related components. By related components, we mean:
-Transformer
-Strainer
-Auto flush flow restrictor
-Float Valve
-High Pressure Switch
-Pressure Gauge
-Shut Off Solenoid

We put together the graphic below to help explain things.


Russ
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hmm. Why would you consider buying a system with two carbon stages?
Well I have done some asking around and was told that was a really good unit. Whats wrong with that? TBH I dont have a big tank. I have a 29g Bio cube and will only need around 5-7 gallons a week.
 

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BuckeyeFldSup said:
Booster pumps make an incredible difference in the performance of RO systems.
Increased pressure dramatically increases the speed at which your RO membrane will produce purified water, and higher pressures result in RO water with lower TDS - which will increase the life span of your DI resin.

How much faster will a system with a booster pump produce water? Here's a couple of scenarios (from the calculator on our home page) as an example:
-75 gpd membrane at 38 psi and 65 degrees F water will produce 43 gpd, or 1.8 gph.
-75 gpd membrane at 80 psi and 65 degrees F water will produce 101 gpd, or 4.2 gph!

Here's some of our test data that illustrates the effect of increased pressure on rejection rate (the higher the rejection rate the more pure the RO water will be and the longer your DI resin will last):

We've been getting a lot of questions lately regarding how best to set up booster pumps and all the related components. By related components, we mean:
-Transformer
-Strainer
-Auto flush flow restrictor
-Float Valve
-High Pressure Switch
-Pressure Gauge
-Shut Off Solenoid

We put together the graphic below to help explain things.

Russ
This is the absolute truth!
 

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Well I have done some asking around and was told that was a really good unit. Whats wrong with that? TBH I dont have a big tank. I have a 29g Bio cube and will only need around 5-7 gallons a week.
Your original post was aboout your well water. Well water isn't chlorinated.

The most important purpose of a carbon prefilter in a RO system using a TFC membrane is to...

Remove chlorine. ONE good carbon block is more than sufficient to remove chlorine from tap water.

So you don't have chlorine in your water and you got a system with not one, but TWO carbon filters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Your original post was aboout your well water. Well water isn't chlorinated.

The most important purpose of a carbon prefilter in a RO system using a TFC membrane is to...

Remove chlorine. ONE good carbon block is more than sufficient to remove chlorine from tap water.

So you don't have chlorine in your water and you got a system with not one, but TWO carbon filters.
so what your saying is that I should cancel my order and place an order with you? What would you recommend?

Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX using Tapatalk
 
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