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Will the UV kill the copes and other critters or are they too large to kill with the uv light? It's a 36watt.

What are the downsides of having the UV in a reef tank?

Is there a method or placement I should consider when drawing from the sump?

Thanks,
Tom
 

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I would say yes they will kill pods if they go through the UV (but that may be dependent on the flow rate, maybe some one else can chime in on this).

The good thing about UV is that it kills everything....the bad is that it kills everything. Some positive microlife will be killed with the bad....UV does not discriminate.

For certain, you want UV as the very last stage of filtration....you want the cleanest water possible to go through your UV. I run mine at the out-take of my magnum 350.

Generally speaking, some people say they do more harm than good in a full blown reef but serve a positive function in a FOWLR. In my FOWLR I have noticed cleaner water, no nusance algae, as well as no ich outbreaks with my UV. I know some reefers run theirs 24/7 while others just one day a week while others do fine without.

I think in the end: you dont really need it......but it is sure nice to have!!
 

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some copepods will find there wat into the uv in the same fashion as they find thier way from the fuge to the display and vis a versa. . but I dont think it will wipeout your population.
 

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The UV will genetically alter the bacteria going threw it rendering it incapable of reproduction..... as for pods going threw it.... maybe you will end up with some teenage mutant ninja pods?
 

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I run my UV in the same chamber as my return pump.

I have a scooter blennie and still have a ton of pods.

Went like 2 weeks without running it and noticed a change..I run it all the time now.

FWIW
 

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mf2055 said:
The UV will genetically alter the bacteria going threw it rendering it incapable of reproduction..... as for pods going threw it.... maybe you will end up with some teenage mutant ninja pods?
Thats pretty funny....lol..i can see it now.....-devil
 

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I run a UV on my 75g and I have a huge pod population and I also have a mandarin. Instead of running mine after the filtration system, I run it before the refugium whch is where all the pods live. I have mechanical filtration before the UV though. THis way the UV is a lot less likely to be killing my pods since it is before the fuge. It probably wouldn't even matter because my tank is teeming with pods to begin with.
 

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UV Brands?

Great thread. I just purchased a Jebeo (NOT Jebo) 36W UV off eBay. It is a piece of junk. Inner quartz leaks and it lit me up when I touched my sump. Fun.

After I send that garbage back, does anyone have experience with the Coralife 6X 18Watt or Jebo (REAL Jebo) 36W?

-Keith
 

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NewV to UV

I am also about to try a uv on my 75. I got it used when i bought my future 125g.
I am curious about the benefits and the reason you all use it. What are the major motivators in using it? Ii is an Aqua 25w. I plan in putting a new bulb in before firing it up. Also am I stupid if I put it between the protein skimmer pump and the protein skimmer?
 

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Good thread. I've spent the last year researching various marine/freshwater UV-C use for everything from commercial fisheries, public aquariums, and of course our aquariums. There's a TON of crap out there to read through and a lot of lies/unreliable data to turn to.
Here's what I've realized:
1. UV-C technology works, it's scientifically tested and we know it "breaks down"DNA and RNA cells.
2. The technology will work on waterborne cells.
3. Knowing what micro wattage (exposure) to utilize is key, and determining the proper exposure rates must be carefully done using a flow meter. Cryptocaryon (Ich) for example requires apx. 280,000 micro watts exposure to be destroyed( rendered unable to reproduce) which is quite high. This means you either need a very large Uv unit or very slow flow through a smaller unit. This means that you can disregard any info that says, " rated for tanks up to 100gal. " water volume isn't important. UV-C exposure is.
4. Most sterilizers require a pump and will not gravity feed.
5. They will not destroy the beneficial bacteria of your reef. These bacteria are present deep within live rock and will not be of concern.
6. Placing the unit on a closed loop is most effective. We want ALL the water going to the display to have been sterilized. This makes unit and pump selection crucial and often difficult.
7. They CAN effect all living organisms, such as copepods, amphipods, planktonic food supply, etc. therefore, there are potential drawbacks when you're also targeting large protozoa like I am. These high exposure rates can render some pods unable to reproduce, although some fish still eat the m. The good thing, if you have a properly targeted exposure rate, most pods are too large to be effected and will pass through the unit with little damage. Again, here's where that flow meter comes into place.
8. The drawback is cost, units are expensive, require more plumbing, pump(s), need bulb replacement, require cleaning, need pricey flow meters and valves and use more electricity.

Jebao, the company that makes the WP-40 makes a decent sterilizer that you can get shipped for about $75. This is a bargin, although the fittings are junk, so add $60 to that for plumbing parts to connect it. Lame lowes prices. So far it functions well, but if you have the cash. Emperor aquatics is top notch. It's a company that has done their research and I think stands behind a great product. Would I pay $300+ for one of their units? Yep , although I clearly didn't.

Before I dropped cash on such a debated item, I turned to peer review journals about the technology and did some extensive homework.
 
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